Helping Lady

We finally took Lady in to the vet, something we probably should have done a month or so ago.  We kept making allowances for the fact that she’s so unfamiliar with human handling and we didn’t want to stress her, but she needs some help now.  Lady arrived as a semi-wild young adult LGD and it’s taken a couple years to get to the point that Lady actually seems to enjoy our company and petting. 

At the vets office she went into her shut down mode.  She stood, head down, eyes half lidded, slightly drooling with stress, willing everything to go away and thinking it would if she just made herself unnoticeable enough.  She’s indoors with me tonight, drying off after having a bath with some medicated shampoo. 

She developed an oily coat just as we headed into the cold winter and it grew steadily worse.  She’s been dropping weight, eating sporadically and having trouble keeping warm enough.  I put vests on her but she always manages to loose them.  


The plan for now is to get her coat and skin infection cleared up.  The blood work showed some concerning results leading to a possible kidney issue but that might very well be resolved if we can get her health back on balance. 

We’ll try to keep her with the sheep as much as possible because that’s where she is the least stressed and about the only place that she’ll even attempt eating, but on the days she gets bathed there is no possible way to have her be outdoors in our winters. 

She’s a very quiet house guest and while she’s not content, she’s warm and comfortable and stressed out enough to just lie down and rest.


8 comments:

  1. Hope it goes well ~ Lady is a sweetie!

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  2. What a beautiful photo. ! : )
    And thank you again for your two art pieces. Did you get to see the exhibition in Saskatoon?
    Happy nearly spring, Monika

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    1. I did not get to the art exhibition no, but I am soooo touched to have been a part of it. That encouraged me beyond words. !!!

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  3. I am a fairly new subscriber, having just found your blog recently. As a result, I do not know the history/background of Lady yet (although I do plan to go back to the Archives and "catch up"!). I can only imagine what came before your loving home to cause her to be the way she is, but whatever it is she is so very lucky to have you now.

    I am 3 years into a similar situation with our cat (although vastly different that a working dog, of course). After we lost our beloved cats due to old age (we had 4), I was inconsolable with grief. One of them, my orange tabby Jasper, helped me through some some of the most difficult times of my adult life. We had a unique bond that was extraordinary. I waded through 2 years of grief before I was able to entertain the thought of adopting another cat. Something caught my eye; a posting on a blog that said by not adopting another pet due to losing one, you're denying a shelter pet a good home; something along those lines. That got through to me, and I went to our local shelter and asked for the cat who was the least likely to be adopted. Well, that brought me Amanda, who had been returned by not one, but two families. She was not even in the general adoption population anymore. After much interviewing, the shelter let me adopt her, and I was hopeful unconditional love and a calm environment would work wonders.

    Fast forward 3 years to the present. I still can't hold her, clip her nails, brush her, or anything of the sort. However, we have reached a certain understanding. She will sleep next to me (but never touching) for short periods of time. She seems to have given me a certain amount of trust, such as with feeding. I tell her I have nothing but time, and she seems to know it.

    I am so sorry things are so difficult for Lady. I so admire you for doing what you can to help her ease in to your family life.

    I apologize for this being so long; I tend to get going on certain subjects!
    Best wishes, Lisa from Oregon

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    1. Welcome Lisa. Kudos to you for seeing a way to help another cat. There are many lessons in living with the shy wild ones. I think Lady has taught me what it means to let an animal be who they are and accept who they are and thus who you are.

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  4. I can only imagine :-/. Hopefully her body will straighten out quickly so her mind can rest easy.

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    1. Yes, fingers and toes crossed for her.

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